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Wines for Beef Wellington

Beef Wellington is a filet of beef that is covered in pate de foie gras and duxelles (a mixture of finely chopped mushrooms, onions, shallots and herbs that have been sautéed in butter). The filet is then wrapped in a puff pastry dough and baked. It is usually served with Hollandaise sauce.

Beef Wellington was originally prepared as a dish that had multiple servings that were sliced from the whole. In recent years, there has been more of a trend to prepare an individual Beef Wellington for each person.

Matching Beef Wellington with wine certainly requires matching with the beef but we must also consider the pate and duxelles.
The short answer to matching Beef Wellington with wine is to use a medium to full bodied dry red wine.
The more detailed answer is to select one of the wines listed below:

Old World Wines

Bordeaux, Red - Select a softer style such as Pomerol or St. Emilion or a well aged Medoc.
Burgundy, Red - Something from the Cote de Nuits would be nice.

New World Wines

Cabernet Sauvignon - A great many choices here. Just select a known brand in your price range.
Merlot - Again, too many good choices to name
Pinot Noir - Take a look at the ones from Oregon.
Syrah - Look at the Shiraz from Australia or wines from the Rhone River in France.
Zinfandel - Look at the California selections. Most of the best producers begin with "R", coincidentally.